More and more sites now require visitors to turn off ad blockers before allowing them into the site. There are several actions you can take. Some, such as pausing AdBlock or whitelisting the site, are quick and easy but you will see ads. These are the best solutions for the majority of AdBlock users. Other methods, such as getting the content in a different way, require some effort on your part but you won't see ads. Did you turn off AdBlock but the site still won't let you in?


Quick, easy, and temporary: Pause AdBlock

For most people, the quickest and easiest solution is simply to pause AdBlock, temporarily allowing the site's ads to appear.


To temporarily stop blocking ads on the current site:

  1. Click the AdBlock button in the browser toolbar and select Pause on this site.
  2.  Reload the page.


AdBlock will automatically start blocking ads again when you leave the site. You can also click the AdBlock button and select Resume blocking ads.


Quick, easy, and persistent: Whitelist the site

If the site is one you enjoy and visit frequently and the ads it serves are non-intrusive, we encourage you to whitelist it. Whitelisting tells AdBlock to always allow ads on that site. There are several ways to whitelist a site. Here is the quickest and easiest way.


To stop blocking ads on the current site:

  1. Click the AdBlock button in the browser toolbar and select Don't run on pages on this site.
  2. In the Don't run AdBlock on... window, click Exclude. The page reloads automatically.


If you change your mind later, click the AdBlock button and select Enable AdBlock on this page.


Get the content in a different way (good for non-technical users)

The following suggestions require a little more work. However, you will not see ads.


View a cached version of the page

Use your browser's reading view


View a cached version of the page

A cached version of a page is the live page captured at a particular moment in time and stored in an online archive, like pictures in a photograph album. Because they aren't live, code doesn't run on them. That means they can't detect ad blockers and they don't include the ads that appear on the live page. (Thank AdBlock fan @OrialiRf for this suggestion.)


Please note, this method doesn't work everywhere or in all circumstances. It won't help you if you're trying to watch a TV show. It's best for articles you want to read. However, it doesn't work on wsj.com, which no longer allows search engines to cache its pages.


To view a cached version of a page:

  1. Enter the name of the publication and a few keywords from the article's title into your favorite search engine.
  2. Click the little down arrow and select Cached. In Google, the arrow is to the right of the website's URL (address). In Bing, it's to the right of the publication's name.


Viewing a cached page in Google search results:


View a cached version of a page in Google search results



Viewing a cached page in Bing search results:


View a cached version of a page in Bing search results



Use your browser's reading view

Read the page in your browser's reading view, if one is available, to strip out ads along with background images, buttons, and other page clutter. Enter the name of your browser and "reading view" into your favorite search engine to learn how to use it.


Please note, reading view isn't available for all pages.


A note to Chrome users

Chrome doesn't have a built-in reading view. Just Read is an extension that simulates one. It includes options for fine-tuning the appearance of a page, but no adjustments are needed for basic reading without clutter such as ads.


To use Just Read:

  1. Pause AdBlock and reload the page.
  2. Click the Just Read button in the Chrome toolbar.


Viewing the page without clutter using the Just Read extension for Chrome



To return the page to its original appearance, click the Just Read button again.


More effort, but no ads (best for advanced users)

The remaining suggestions are recommended for those who are more comfortable with technical solutions.


Hide AdBlock by turning off JavaScript

Hide AdBlock using a custom filter


Hide AdBlock (and avoid ads) by turning off JavaScript

Most sites use JavaScript to fetch ads and to test for the presence of ad blockers. You can avoid ads and prevent sites from detecting you're using AdBlock by turning off JavaScript. Enter the name of your browser and "disable JavaScript" into your favorite search engine to learn how.


Warning: Turning off JavaScript can break sites. If you only want to read an article, you may not notice any missing functionality.


Hide AdBlock using a custom filter

An older method to avoid detection still works on some sites. Add the following custom filter to AdBlock, replacing "domain.com" with the domain name of the site that's giving you trouble: @@||domain.com$generichide


Warning: Custom filters can break sites. Please see these important warnings before using them.


Did you turn off AdBlock but the site still won't let you in?

A site may detect that you're using an ad blocker even if you have paused AdBlock or whitelisted the site or if you don't have an ad blocker at all. If this happens to you, then something else in your browser or on your computer is causing the site to falsely detect that you're using an ad blocker. Please try these troubleshooting steps.


How does a site know you're using AdBlock?

One common way sites can detect ad blockers is to download a tiny piece of JavaScript code as "bait" for an ad blocker. Then they use another piece of code to test whether the download occurred. If the download is blocked, then the site assumes an ad blocker is in use regardless of how it was blocked. This is why a site may decide you're using an ad blocker even if you aren't.


Why doesn't AdBlock try to bypass ad-block blockades?

It's frustrating to encounter a site that shuts out visitors who use an ad blocker. It's the number one complaint of people who use ad blockers, in fact. We feel your pain. There are problems with online ads. They're getting better, thanks to ad blockers and the people who use them. But for good or ill, ads pay for the content we all enjoy, for now, at least. Our perspective is that sites have a right to turn away visitors who block the ads that support them. You're welcome to disagree, of course. :)


What about mobile devices?

The suggestions in this article work on your computer. If you use AdBlock on a mobile device, you can pause AdBlock to stop blocking ads while you're on a blockaded site. If you use an iPhone or iPad, you can also whitelist sites.